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Eli Dagworthy’s Redcoat
Courtesy Dumbarton House/The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America, Washington, DC

Eli Dagworthy’s Redcoat

Date: 1768
Credit: Lent by Dumbarton House/The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America, Washington, D.C.

Dimensions / Weight

Dimensions: 41" H x 13.5" W

Physical Description

Madder red wool coat with yellow facings. The lapels are adorned with pointed lace bastion and were buttoned open to expose a waistcoat. The regimental lace decoration for the 44th is white with a yellow stripe between one black and one blue zig-zag. The lace is 1/2 inch wide. Drop front breeches of buff leather.

Specific History

Red wool coat worn by British Loyalist Lieutenant Eli Dagworthy of the 44th Regiment of Foot.

General History

The redcoat was the symbol of British influence and oppression in colonial America after the French and Indian War. Worn by the majority of the British Army, the redcoat was both feared and respected by Continental Army forces. Capturing a coat was a much sought prize by American militiamen.


Keywords

Countries: Great Britain, United States
War: War of American Independence
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