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Japanese Arisaka Rifle with Bayonet
Division of Military History and Diplomacy, National Museum of American History

Japanese Arisaka Rifle with Bayonet

Catalog #: 59478M    Accession #: 214893
Credit: Division of Military History and Diplomacy, National Museum of American History

Maker

Colonel Nariakira Arisaka (Inventor)

Colonel Nariakira Arisaka headed a commission during the 1890s which was charged with developing a new rifle to replace the earlier models such as the Murata.

Dimensions / Weight

Dimensions: 6.25" H x 66" W x 4" D

Physical Description

Japanese Arisaka Type 38 rifle, 6.5 mm with forged steel bayonet; partially eradicated chrysanthemum stamp on receiver.

General History

The Japanese Arisaka Type 38 rifles were all turn bolt operated, with 5-round non-detachable staggered row box magazines. They were loaded with 5-round stripper clips, a flat metal piece holding a five-round stack, which was inserted at the top of the magazine, the rounds thumbed down into position, and the metal piece sent flying when the bolt was closed. This rifle was named for Colonel Nariakira Arisaka. During the 1890's he headed a commission charged with developing a new rifle to replace the earlier models such as the Murata. The Arisaka rifles were designated with the year of the current emperor's reign. Thus, the Type 38 rifle was designed in the 38th year of the reign of Emperor Meiji which would have been 1905. The rifle was stamped on the receiver with a 16 petal chrysanthemum which was the symbol of the Japanese Emperor. The chrysanthemum stamp showed the rifle was manufactured for the Imperial Japanese Army and therefore, belonged to the Emperor. As a face saving gesture, Japanese soldiers who surrendered after the war made an attempt to grind the symbol off their rifles.


Keywords

Country: Japan
War: World War II
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