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M1872 Cavalry Sergeant Full Dress Uniform, also know as a 'Buffalo Soldier' uniform
Armed Forces History, Division of History of Technology, National Museum of American History

M1872 Cavalry Sergeant Full Dress Uniform, also know as a "Buffalo Soldier" uniform

Credit: Armed Forces History, Division of History of Technology, National Museum of American History

Dimensions / Weight

Dimensions: 28" H x 22" W

Physical Description

M1872 Cavalry Sergeant Full Dress Uniform

Blue wool, single breasted with gold colored buttons. Yellow facings indicate the coat was worn by a member of the cavalry. Sky blue wool pants with yellow side stripe. Wool flet dress hat with enlisted insignia on crown and plume socket. Yellow cord and plume.

General History

During the Civil War over 180,000 African Americans served in the Union Army. About 33,000 were killed. After the Civil War, in 1866, legislation established two Cavalry and four infantry regiments which would be made up of African-Americans. Out of all the new recruits, most had served in all black units during the war. The mounted regiments were the 9th Cavalry and 10th Cavalry, which were soon nicknamed by the Cheyenne and Comanche as the "Buffalo Soldiers." Until the early 1890s, they made up about 20 percent of all Cavalry forces on the American frontier. They subdued hostile Native Americans, outlaws, and Mexican revolutionaries. Because of their skill and reputation, they consistently received some of the most dangerous and difficult assignments the army had to offer. Some of their most famous adversaries were Geronimo, Sitting Bull, Victorio, Lone Wolf, Billy the Kid, and Pancho Villa.


Keywords

Country: United States
War: Indian Resistance
Service: Army
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