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Woodrow Wilson's Lincoln Highway Association membership card, 1913

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Woodrow Wilson's Lincoln Highway Association membership card, 1913
NMAH, Transportation Collections

IN CONTEXT

This object appears in the following sections:


Americans Adopt the Auto:
Americans Adopt the Auto — Better Roads

OTHER VIEWS
Reverse side of Woodrow Wilson's Lincoln Highway Association membership card, 1913
Reverse side of Woodrow Wilson's Lincoln Highway Association membership card, 1913


Envelope for Wilson's Lincoln Highway Association membership card, 1913
Envelope for Wilson's Lincoln Highway Association membership card, 1913

RELATED OBJECTS
Lincoln Highway Marker


Lincoln Highway Association membership plaque


President Woodrow Wilson's Lincoln Highway Association membership card
Currently on display
From the Smithsonian Collection

President Woodrow Wilson was officially the first member of the Lincoln Highway Association. The Association used memberships, which cost five dollars a head, to publicize the highway.

Physical Description

paper. Two sided, membership card, with original envelope. Card 2 3/10" high, 3 6/10" wide. Front reads: No. 1, The Lincoln Highway Association, Contributor's Ticket, Issued to Mr. Woodrow Wilson. Back reads: The holder of this card is a contributor to the funds of the Lincoln Highway Association whose object is to immediately promote and procure the establishment of a continuous, improved highway from the Atlantic to the Pacific, open to all lawful traffic of all descriptions without toll charges; and to be of concrete wherever practicable. This highway is to be known as "The Lincoln Highway," in memory of Abraham Lincoln. National Headquarters, Detroit, Michigan. Signed: A. R. Pardington, secretary. September 19, 1913.

Details
Date Made:
September 19, 1913
Locations:
Dist of Columbia, Michigan
History

During the 19th century, cities usually had decent roads, but rural roads were often little more than muddy trails. In the 1880s, bicyclists and railroad companies began calling for good roads, but American road building really took off in the 20th century as a response to rising numbers of cars and trucks. Some of these new roads were private initiatives, such as the Lincoln Highway, but after 1916, federal law and government money fueled much of the country's road building.

Related People, Places, and Events
User
Woodrow Wilson (1856 - 1924)
Democratic President of the United States from 1912 to 1920.


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