Games Learning Resources Visit the Museum
America on the Move
Collection Exhibition Themes
BackSearch
Containership Newark (model)

Enlarge Image
Containership Newark (model)
Smithsonian Institution, Photo by Richard Strauss, Negative #: 2003-27979

IN CONTEXT

This object appears in the following sections:


Transforming the Waterfront: San Francisco and Oakland, California, 1960–1970
Transforming the Waterfront: San Francisco and Oakland, California, 1960–1970 — The Container System

RELATED OBJECTS
Sea-Land dock


Sea-Land intermodal transport


Containership Newark (model)
Catalog #: 329,680, Accession #: 283,578
Currently on display
From the Smithsonian Collection
The model was donated to the Smithsonian in 1969 and was displayed in the Hall of American Maritime Enterprise until 2002, when it was removed for installation in "America on the Move."
Physical Description
Model. The model is 1/8" scale and measures 66" L x 9" W x 17 1/2" H. It shows the containership Newark loaded with standard shipping containers stacked on deck. The stack of the ship is marked with the Sea-Land insignia and the containers are all marked with the Sea-Land logo.
Details
Date Made:
1968
Dates Used:
1945
Locations:
California, Delaware, Texas
Credit:
Sea-Land Service, Inc.
History
Built as a C-4 troopship by the Kaiser Co., Inc., at Richmond, California, in 1945, the vessel was launched as the General H. B. Freeman. In 1968 it was owned by the Containership Chartering Service, of Wilmington, Delaware, and converted to a containership at Todd Shipyards Corporation, in Galveston, Texas. Renamed Newark, it joined a fleet of "trailerships" operated by Sea-Land Service, Inc., for hauling freight. The reference to "trailers" reflects the background of Sea-Land's founder, trucking entrepreneur Malcom McLean, whose early experiments with loading truck trailers on ships are acknowledged as the advent of modern intermodal, containerized transportation.

National Museum of American History About This Site | Sponsors | Buy the Book | E-mail Signup | Credits