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Warning Bell from a Chicago Transit Station

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Warning Bell from a Chicago Transit Station

RELATED OBJECTS
Madison & Wabash


Warning Bell from a Chicago Transit Station
Catalog #: 2003.0074.02, Accession #: 2003.0074
Currently on display
From the Smithsonian Collection
This bell was used by the Chicago Transit Authority (and predecessors) to warn the station manager or train conductor to collect fares from customers who entered the platform by way of the exit stairs. The bell was hanging on the platform-side facade of the Madison & Wabash inner Loop elevated station until the CTA removed it and donated it to NMAH for the America on the Move exhibition.
Physical Description
Artifact. Clam shell-shaped warning bell, metal on a wooden base. Marked “FARADAY " 18” H x 12 1/4” W x 6” D. Restored.
Details
Date Made:
early 1900's
Dates Used:
early 1900's - 2000
Locations:
Illinois
Note:
Chicago
Credit:
Gift of Chicago Transit Authority
History
Chicago's four early rapid transit "L" lines were privately owned and operated, each serving a different area of the rapidly growing city . The first line opened in 1892, the last in 1900. In 1897, Chicago's Union Loop elevated tracks were put into operation, allowing all the rapid transit lines to bring passengers into the city's central business district. The entire system was municipilized in 1947, when the newly formed Chicago Transit Authority took control of most of the city's rail and street transit operations.
Related People, Places, and Events
Manufacturer
Faraday

Donor
Chicago Transit Authority

Use
Chicago, Illinois


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