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Fowler tricycle model
Fowler tricycle model
Francis Fowler, of New Haven, Connecticut, was issued Patent 224,165 on 3 February 1880, for a tricycle equipped with a ratchet connection in the hub of each driving wheel. The purpose was to enable the outer of the two driving wheels to rotate freely on the crankshaft when the machine was...
Region: New England
      
State: CT
      
Era: 1870-1900
Greene and Dyer monocycle
Greene and Dyer monocycle
Allen Greene and Elisha Dyer, of Providence, Rhode Island, were awarded Patent 91,535, on 22 June 1869 for an “improvement in velocipede.” This incomplete monocycle, built by them, represents their invention. It was donated to the Smithsonian in 1944. The donor stated that it was reported that...
Region: New England
      
State: RI
      
Era: 1850-1877
Hammelmann tricycle model
Hammelmann tricycle model
On 2 March 1880, Charles Hammelmann, of Buffalo, New York, was issued Patent 225,010 for a velocipede.This Patent Office model of a velocipede shows a tricycle propelled by two foot-operated, spring-returned levers that rock sector-racks meshed with ratchet gears on the front-wheel axle. The...
Region: Middle Atlantic
      
State: NY
      
Era: 1870-1900
Hobby horse
Hobby horse
One of only a few original Hobby Horses to be found in the United States, this machine is unidentified, but is believed by the donor to be possibly of French origin. It was donated to the Museum in 1964.
Region: International
      
Era: 1801-1861
Humber “Genuine Beeston” racing ordinary bicycle
Humber “Genuine Beeston” racing ordinary bicycle
This lightweight racing Ordinary, weighing only 24 pounds, was built by Humber and Co., Ltd., of Beeston, Nottingham, England, in 1886 and was completely restored to "as new" condition by its donor before being presented to the Smithsonian in 1934. This make of Ordinary was ridden by many...
Region: International
      
Era: 1870-1900
Iver Johnson bicycle
Iver Johnson bicycle
This bicycle was donated to the Smithsonian in 1961. It was made in Fitchburg, Massachusetts by the Iver Johnson Arms and Cycle Works. It has a drop-frame to accomodate women's skirts, and is a typical example of bicycle of the era.
Region: New England
      
State: MA
      
Era: 1890-1930
Klahr bicycle model
Klahr bicycle model
William Klahr, of Myerstown, Pennsylvania, was issued patent number 285,821 on 2 October 1883 for a bicycle of the Star type, propelled by single-acting pedal levers in combination with racks, pinions, and clutches on the rear axle. This patent office model of the bicycle was transferred to the...
Region: Middle Atlantic
      
State: PA
      
Era: 1870-1900
Laubach velocipede
Laubach velocipede
This velocipede was donated to the Museum in 1971. It is one of the few departures from conventional velocipede construction that achieved any appreciable popularity. The design was invented by Dr. William H. Laubach, of Philadelphia and assigned U.S. Patent 86,235 on 26 January 1869. ...
Region: Middle Atlantic
      
State: NY, PA
      
Era: 1850-1877
Long steam tricycle
Long steam tricycle
The oldest completely operable self-propelled road vehicle in the Museum is a steam tricycle built about 1880 by George A. Long, of Northfield, Massachusetts. After a period of disuse following its construction, Long's original tricycle was disassembled and its parts scattered. In 1946,...
Region: New England
      
State: CT, MA
      
Era: 1870-1900
Man's Cleveland safety bicycle, about 1899
Man's Cleveland safety bicycle, about 1899
This bicycle was used by L. J. Powers who road to work in Nashua, Iowa from his home in Powersville on a daily basis between the years of 1899 and 1902. It was donated to the Smithsonian Institution in 1989.
Region: West North Central
      
State: IA
      
Era: 1870-1900, 1890-1930
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