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America on the Move
Collection Exhibition Themes
Transportation in America before 1876 Community Dreams: Santa Cruz, California, 1876 Delivering the Goods: Watsonville, California, 1895 A Streetcar City: Washington, D.C., 1900 People on the Move Roadside Communities: Ring's Rest, Muirkirk, Maryland, 1930s The People's Highway: Route 66, 1930s-1940s Lives on the Railroad: Salisbury, North Carolina, 1927 Americans Adopt the Auto Crossing the Country: Somewhere in Wyoming, 1903 The Connected City: New York, New York, 1920s On the School Bus: Martinsburg, Indiana, 1939 Family Camping: York Beach, Maine, 1930s City and Suburb: Chicago and Park Forest, Illinois, 1950s On the Interstate: I-10, 1956-1990 Transforming the Waterfront: San Francisco and Oakland, California, 1960-1970 Going Global: Los Angeles Introduction Businesses on the Strip Leave the Driving to Us Hot Rods and Hangouts Making the Sale
14: Suburban Strip: Sandy Boulevard, Portland, Oregon, 1949

“Leave the Driving to Us”

Americans who rode intercity buses in the 1930s and early 1940s were using one of the most convenient, modern, and comfortable forms of motor transportation of the time. Advertisements, movies, and on-board amenities made bus travel seem glamorous and modern. Streamlined design and art deco bus stations added to the allure. During World War II, when car production nearly ceased and gasoline was rationed, bus riding hit its peak. But after 1950, more people drove cars or took a plane to travel long distance. A streamlined bus cruising down the highway no longer heralded the future. In the 1950s, buses had become the way that people who could afford no other means of transportation traveled.

Central bus depot, Portland, Oregon, about 1940
Central bus depot, Portland, Oregon, about 1940
Greyhound advertisement, 1949
Greyhound advertisement, 1949
Greyhound bus schedule, 1948
Greyhound bus schedule, 1948
Greyhound bus brochure, 1949
Greyhound bus brochure, 1949
Silversides bus, 1949
Silversides bus, 1949
The streamlined Greyhound Silversides bus was designed by industrial stylist Raymond Loewy. Built by GMC Truck and Coach Division, it was an icon of modern design on America’s highways in the 1940s.
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