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America on the Move
Collection Exhibition Themes
Transportation in America before 1876 Community Dreams: Santa Cruz, California, 1876 Delivering the Goods: Watsonville, California, 1895 A Streetcar City: Washington, D.C., 1900 Transforming the Waterfront: San Francisco and Oakland, California, 1960-1970 On the Interstate: I-10, 1956-1990 City and Suburb: Chicago and Park Forest, Illinois, 1950s Suburban Strip: Sandy Boulevard, Portland, Oregon, 1949 On the School Bus: Martinsburg, Indiana, 1939 Family Camping: York Beach, Maine, 1930s Roadside Communities: Ring's Rest, Muirkirk, Maryland, 1930s The People's Highway: Route 66, 1930s-1940s Lives on the Railroad: Salisbury, North Carolina, 1927 Americans Adopt the Auto Crossing the Country: Somewhere in Wyoming, 1903 The Connected City: New York, New York, 1920s People on the Move Manufacturing Success Fusion Food LA People Introduction L.A., Global City
18: Going Global: Los Angeles, 2000

LA People

Dubbed by some people as the City of Dreams, Los Angeles is a destination for migrants from across the nation and around the world. With a rich blend of cultural traditions, the diverse makeup of the citizenry makes LA an exciting place to live and a hotbed of innovation.

The constant influx of new and motivated workers also helps to power the city’s giant economy. With major ports connecting the city to the world and excellent road and rail links to the rest of the country, Los Angeles’s broad-based economy is so big that in 1999 it would have ranked as the eleventh largest country in the world.

Los Angeles freeway sign
Los Angeles freeway sign

LA Neighborhoods

Like other cities, Los Angeles is made up of many different communities. The diverse nature of the population and commerce of the city is reflected in these neighborhoods.

Japantown
Koreatown

Immigration

With thousands of migrants arriving daily from Asia and Latin America, Los Angeles International Airport is the busiest immigration port in the United States. People also come to LA by land and occasionally by sea. The nearby Mexican border is especially permeable and the attraction of jobs makes the city an attractive destination for numerous Latino immigrants.

Aerial view of Los Angeles International Airport
Aerial view of Los Angeles International Airport
Asians arriving at Los Angeles International Airport
Asians arriving at Los Angeles International Airport
Airplane arriving at Los Angeles International Airport
Airplane arriving at Los Angeles International Airport
An Asian family at Los Angeles International Airport
An Asian family at Los Angeles International Airport

Ports

International trade is a critical element in the Los Angeles economy. Three ports—Long Beach, Los Angeles, and Hueneme—connect the city to the Pacific Rim and feed the important import/export business sector. Good rail and road links mean that imported goods can quickly be distributed throughout the nation.

Port of Los Angeles
Port of Los Angeles
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