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America on the Move
Collection Exhibition Themes
Transportation in America before 1876 Community Dreams: Santa Cruz, California, 1876 Delivering the Goods: Watsonville, California, 1895 People on the Move The Connected City: New York, New York, 1920s Crossing the Country: Somewhere in Wyoming, 1903 Americans Adopt the Auto Lives on the Railroad: Salisbury, North Carolina, 1927 The People's Highway: Route 66, 1930s-1940s Roadside Communities: Ring's Rest, Muirkirk, Maryland, 1930s Family Camping: York Beach, Maine, 1930s On the School Bus: Martinsburg, Indiana, 1939 Suburban Strip: Sandy Boulevard, Portland, Oregon, 1949 City and Suburb: Chicago and Park Forest, Illinois, 1950s On the Interstate: I-10, 1956-1990 Transforming the Waterfront: San Francisco and Oakland, California, 1960-1970 Going Global: Los Angeles Introduction Center Market The New Market System Farm to Market City Streetscapes Fares, Please! Growth of the Capital's Suburbs
4: A  Streetcar City: Washington, D.C., 1900

The New Market System

The national rail system enabled businessmen to devise new distribution systems. Meat came from the stockyards (by refrigerated railroad car) to regional distributors for delivery to local butchers. Growers sent fruits and vegetables to wholesalers for resale to retailers. National brands came into being to take advantage of national advertising and distribution networks.

Wholesale businesses near Center Market on Louisiana Avenue at 9th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C.,  about 1900
Wholesale businesses near Center Market on Louisiana Avenue at 9th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C., about 1900
Business card for William Dix, dairyman, Washington, D.C., 1890s
Business card for William Dix, dairyman,
Washington, D.C., 1890s
Business card for Andrew Wonder, fishmonger,Washington, D.C., 1890s
Business card for Andrew Wonder, fishmonger,
Washington, D.C., 1890s
Morris Miller's grocery, 1700 Euclid Street, N.W., Washington, D.C.
Morris Miller's grocery, 234 Upshur Street, N.W., Washington, D.C.

Neighborhood Groceries

Independent grocers established stores near their customers’ homes. Although there were tensions between public market officials and neighborhood shopkeepers, the businesses complemented each other. People could shop at the corner store when the markets were closed, and shopkeepers often tailored their stock to the needs, economic level, and ethnic character of a neighborhood.

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