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The Stewards’ Department
 
A combined menu and music program, 1929
A combined menu and music program, 1929

The immense Stewards’ Department fulfilled Leviathan's food service and hospitality requirements, functioning much like the staff of a large hotel. At its core were the stewards themselves, men and women who assisted passengers in their cabins and in the ship’s public rooms. Bellboys, store attendants, barbers, lift operators, musicians, interpreters, and a gardener provided for passengers’ varied needs during the week’s voyage.

No group aboard outnumbered the ship’s food staff. In 1924, the United States Lines employed almost 300 waiters in Leviathan’s dining saloons—150 in first class alone. Behind the scenes, an army of cooks, assistant cooks, utility men, and pantrymen prepared three meals a day for everyone aboard. The first-class kitchen was particularly specialized, with multiple head and assistant chefs for sauces, the larder, soups, hors d’oeuvres, fish, roasts, entrees, vegetables, and the grill. In addition to 15 butchers, 20 bakers, and assorted plate washers, the ship had one bugler to call first-class passengers to dinner. Due to the federal prohibition of alcoholic beverages, the Leviathan put to sea with no bartenders or wine stewards.
Silver butter plate
Silver butter plate
A first-class dinner menu, 1923
A first-class dinner menu, 1923
Inside the dinner menu
Inside the dinner menu
Another butter plate
Another butter plate
Souvenir pin, about 1932
Souvenir pin, about 1932
Most of the Stewards’ Department crew who provided specialty services worked in first class, but souvenir sales knew no class division.
Cover from a music program, 1928
Cover from a music program, 1928
Leviathan's crew typically included an instrumental ensemble that performed for first-class passengers. At times, other bands were engaged for short runs to entertain in second or third class.
Souvenir log, 1924
Souvenir log, 1924
The Leviathan's print shop was one of the finest afloat. It produced a daily newspaper and satisfied the ship’s enormous demand for menus and announcements. At the very end of each crossing the shop rushed out souvenir logs like this one, ready for presentation to each passenger before he or she stepped ashore.
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