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American aristocracy
 

When Henry Ford began mass producing the Model T in 1908, he brought about a shift in the demographics of the average automobile owner. Early automobiles had been very expensive and were often only available to the wealthy upper class. Mass production allowed the price of a Model T to drop from an original list price of $850 to only $260 in 1925. Although the majority of America still did not own an automobile, Ford’s Model T enticed more than 15 million people to buy a car.

As the automobile became more popular, a small market developed that continued to cater to the wealthy elite. With references to kings, crowns, knights, and empires, certain manufacturers marketed an American aristocracy. These cars were often produced in limited numbers, were highly decorative, came with many standard features, and cost several thousand dollars more than the Model T.
Austin Automobile Company radiator emblem
Austin Automobile Company radiator emblem
Not to be confused with the more successful British manufacturer of the same name, only about 1000 American Austins were produced from 1901 to 1921.
King Motor Car Company radiator emblem
King Motor Car Company radiator emblem
Although the King was named after its founder, Charles B. King, with prices ranging from $1,400 to $4,235, this was not a car for the average citizen.
Windsor radiator emblem
Windsor radiator emblem
The auto marketed as the White Prince of Windsor originally used the coat of arms of the Prince of Wales to evoke a sense of royalty, but after objections from Buckingham Palace, the logo was modified.
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