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Without words
 

Although most manufacturers included text on their radiator emblems - the name of the vehicle model or company, the location of manufacture, a catchy motto - a few emblems relied entirely upon images. Think of the difficulties of building a brand image without using words.

Rickenbacker radiator emblem
Rickenbacker radiator emblem
This auto emblem was taken from First Lieutenant Eddie Rickenbacker's flying squadron insignia, the "Hat in the Ring." Rickenbacker (1890-1973) was a well known race car driver and WWI flying ace. Three well-known automobile executives from the EMF Company-Barney Everitt, William Metzger and Walter E. Flanders-offered Rickenbacker a position as vice-president and director of sales if he gave his name to the new automobile.
Cadillac radiator emblem
Cadillac radiator emblem
Henry M. Leland (1843-1932), an Oldsmobile mechanic, chose a representation of the coat of arms of Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac (1658-1730) as the symbol and name of his new vehicle. Cadillac was a French explorer and is credited as the founder of Detroit. The company now regards the emblem as a symbol of pioneering spirit and leadership.
Roosevelt radiator emblem
Roosevelt radiator emblem

Do you recognize the 26th president (1901-1909)? Naming a car after a president can imply a general notion of power and leadership. It may also reflect some of personal characteristics of a specific president. In the case of Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919), it might be his sense of adventure and sportsmanship.

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