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> Technological Solutions
 
1925 Franklin sedan with plate glass windows
1925 Franklin sedan with plate glass windows
1926 Stutz sedan with wire glass safety windshield
1926 Stutz sedan with wire glass safety windshield

Early cars had plate glass windshields and windows. In a collision, the glass broke into sharp, dagger-like pieces that could injure or kill motorists. In 1926, Stutz embedded horizontal wires in its windshields to minimize shattering. Another safety feature of the 1926 Stutz was its low center of gravity, which reduced sway and rollover. Heavy steel runningboards were designed to provide side-impact protection. The company advertised the Safety Stutz, but at $2,995 it was too expensive for most Americans.

A more effective solution to the problem of shattered windshields was a "sandwich" of glass and celluloid that held fragments together on impact. Triplex glass was standard equipment on the 1928 Ford Model A windshield and attracted attention because it was mass-marketed on a low-priced car.

General Motors installed shatterproof Duplate windshield glass on 1929 Cadillac cars. Like Triplex, Duplate consisted of two sheets of glass with an intermediate layer of celluloid. Duplate was made by the Pittsburgh Safety Glass Company, which was owned by Pittsburgh Plate Glass and DuPont.

Triplex safety glass brochure
Triplex safety glass brochure
Duplate safety glass brochure
Duplate safety glass brochure
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