A | More | Perfect | Union --  Japanese Americans and the U.S. Constitution
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Reflections
Reactions found 111 stories, showing stories 81-85

Viva
Sandy wrote:
"And Betty, easily the Germans were not bothered because they were white..."

For the record: Almost 11,000 German Americans were interned. Some remained locked up for more than three years after the war in Europe had ended.

Art
Betty wrote:
"President and the military did not call for interning German Americans on the east coast to create a zone along that cost, free of the enemy?"

As a matter of fact on both the east and west coasts the President and the military internment German Americans, excluded German Americans, and forced German Americans to depart from certain military zones.

April Ruchugo
I think the U.S. was plain ignorant.just like the slave trade.

Denis S.
I think U.S. is today the most racist and intolerant nation all over the world. The most ironic of all this is that America is a place where people all around the world came and made it what it is today.
Native Americans, Japanese Americans, African Americans...
What do they have in common? No, itīs not segregation, racism, hatred, fear, minority... itīs the second word - Americans.
It seems that the so called Land of Freedom, Defenders of Democracy committed and still commit several crimes against itself, uh?
What a shame...
But I read some reflections on this website, and some people really inspire some hope.
Peace!

Lynda
This is a very well done piece of work. A look at a time in history that can break your heart. It should be required reading for students, and probably a lot of adults as well.

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