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TITLE
War Gum: "Blowing Up the Wan River Railway Bridge"
 
DESCRIPTION
War Gum: "Blowing Up the Wan River Railway Bridge" (No. 61)

Text on reverse of card: "While powerful Japanese armies were steadily smashing ahead on far-flung battlefronts in their campaign to hammer China into submission, Chinese armies were carrying out their "scorched earth policy" by destroying everything of value to advancing Japanese troops. When the invaders captured that important city of Tajan on the Tientsin-Pukow railway, on January 2, 1938, the retreating Chinese troops blew up a bridge across the Wen River. Dynamite was carefully planted under its widest arches by three Chinese engineers in a skiff. After poling off to a safe distance, the destruction crew turned to view the results of their handiwork as the explosive was touched off from the shore. An approaching train narrowly missed doom on the demolished track. Their work finished, the Chinese then withdrew from Tajan, establishing a new defense line at Tawnkow. At Canton city officials threatened to destroy the populous port rather than surrender it to Japan.
To know the HORRORS OF WAR is to want PEACE. This is one of a series of 240 True Stories of Modern Warfare. Save to get them all. Copyright 1938, Gum, Inc., Phila., Pa."
 
CONTEXT
"Bubble-gum cards emerged from their wrappers, smelling of powdered sugar, in comic-book colors with armies and soldiers, tanks and planes, blood and gore...There was a message on each to justify their acquisition to the parents who provided the pennies: "To know the HORRORS OF WAR is to want PEACE." We kids hardly noticed....
A curious, comic-book war survives on the cards, the dream visions of gum-company copywriters. Whether the scenes were gruesome or glorious, the colors were always as bright as the outlook for victory. The enemy was always vicious and often cowardly, while our side was always brave and fought like heroes."
Stanley Weintraub, "The Bubble Gum Wars," in MHQ
 
CREDIT
Gum, Inc.
Courtesy of Carl Sheeley
 
DATE
1938